Can BlackBerry Make a Comeback With Their New Z10?

Can BlackBerry Make a Comeback With Their New Z10?

February 14th, 2013

BlackBerry (formerly Research in Motion) is making a bid to get back in the smartphone game and keep a toehold on corporate users with their latest products. With just 4.6 percent of the global market share in 2012 (down from 10.3% in 2011), according to IDC, they have a long way to go.

  • The new BlackBerry 10 smartphones feature a 4.2” touchscreen display and standard photo and video capabilities, along with several other goodies:
  • BlackBerry Flow and BlackBerry Peek – The new interface with intuitive gesture-based navigation allows users to move from one app to another by swiping the screen and multi-task by swiping from the bottom of the display.
  • BlackBerry Hub – A central hub funnels all email and social media communications into a unified repository, including Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn and BlackBerry Messenger.
  • BlackBerry Messenger – Along with basic texting, Messenger supports video conferencing, screen sharing and data sharing.
  • BlackBerry Balance – Geared toward corporate users, Balance offers two separate, secure spaces in one. Companies can grant their employees access to work-related information on one side, while keeping their personal space separate on the other. Personal data is not accessible by the organization, and work data is not accessible on the personal side. Additionally, if an employee leaves the company, voluntarily or involuntarily, their device can easily be disconnected from the corporate workspace.
  • BlackBerry WebWorks – HTML5-based tool enables you to build your own dashboards and scorecards for monitoring key information.

Here’s a quick run-down on the pros and cons:

Positives:

  • Will be widely available from U.S. carriers (AT&T, Verizon, T-Mobile, Sprint)
  • Predictive touch-keyboard text
  • Standards-compatible browser
  • Fluid interface
  • Good messaging hub
  • Flash plug-in – not a must anymore, but nice to have

Negatives:

  • Fewer available apps compared to major competitors
  • BlackBerry Balance requires a user to purchase BlackBerry Enterprise Service 10 for all enterprise-related features
  • Maps feature leaves something to be desired
  • Bare-bones voice control services
  • No native support for Google’s services
  • Only 2 devices available in the first half of 2013 (BlackBerry Z10 and BlackBerry Q10)

The new BlackBerry devices may help in slowing defections and should thrill true BlackBerry fans. But even though the smartphones pack some great new features, these and fairly standard pricing likely won’t be enough lure away iOS or Android users (BlackBerry Z10 is expected to cost $149 to $199 with a wireless contract). Word on the street (so far) is that the ailing company won’t be able to gain much new market share unless they can bring more to the table.

Check out this video from CrackBerrydotCom for more info:

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